Saturday, January 20, 2018

Postcards for the Weekend: Aerial Views

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Postcrossing card from Germany, December 2017
Saarschleife – From the river Saar in Germany.


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Postcrossing card from Germany, December 2017
Burgruine Landeck (Landeck Castle), Klingenm├╝nster


Little Dream in Big World

Postcrossing card from Singapore, January 2018
”Little Dream in a Big World”


Postcards for the Weekend

Postcards for the weekend 69: Aerial Views

Friday, January 19, 2018

Skywatch Friday

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Foggy morning view from my balcony…

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Icicles on the balcony rail

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The fog lifted later, and I was able to go out for a walk in the winter sun.

No, those three long shadows are not me and two skinny friends…

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… just me next to this gate!


SkyWatch Friday


My Town Shoot Out


Thursday, January 18, 2018

Duolingo Progress Report

A new year has begun, and it’s been about three months since my last report

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18.01.2018

I seem to have gone up one Duolingo level in each language, I think (+ added Norwegian). : )

Spanish: Finished all four seasons of the Spanish Netflix TV series Velvet (with Swedish subtitles) before Christmas.

Dutch: Reading Het Achterhuis (Anne Frank’s Diary) in Dutch on my Kindle… (I also have my old Swedish copy to compare with.)

Turkish: I’ve almost finished watching the 2nd season (another 100 30-min episodes) of the Turkish drama series Parampar├ža (on Swedish television, with Swedish subtitles). And I  quite unintentionally managed to detect a few Turkish words spoken by neighbours in my building… (of whom I did not know where they were from, but now I suspect…)

Welsh: Still frightfully difficult! (They even seem to spell some words differently depending on what word comes before…)

(German & French: Freshening up old knowledge a bit, now and then. - And watched a French film at New Year.) 

Danish: 4th season of Swedish/Danish series Bron/Broen running on Swedish Television now…

Russian: Slow progress… still struggling with the alphabet…

Norwegian: Is kind of like a dialect of Swedish (or the other way round! not to upset anyone…) The main difficulty is to keep apart Norwegian and Danish and not mix all three languages up in some home-made Scandinavian blend…


Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Weather the Weather

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A "whether to weather the weather" kind of day here today… 

Weather

My compromise: A short slushy walk, and being thankful for the possibility to shop groceries online (with home delivery tomorrow)…

Monday, January 15, 2018

Recently (Re)Read: Strong Poison

Strong Poison (The Lord Peter Wimsey Mysteries Book 6) by [Sayers, Dorothy L.]

The first book I read (or finished reading) in 2018 was Strong Poison, a Lord Peter Wimsey mystery by Dorothy L. Sayers; first published in 1931.

I’ve read it before; more than once, but probably in Swedish. I bought the whole Wimsey series for Kindle some years ago (reduced price at the time) (and got rid of a few falling-apart old paperbacks from my bookshelves). I (re)read the first (Whose Body) and the second (Clouds of Witness) in 2016-17; but now felt like skipping ahead a few to Strong Poison, which is where Peter first makes the acquaintance of Harriet Vane – a crime novelist herself, and now accused of the murder of her ex-lover, another writer. Lord Peter does not believe she is guilty, and gives it his best effort to find out and prove what really happened. It’s clear from the beginning that the victim died of poison; the question is how. Did he take his own life? or was he killed by someone else? This book is a good example of a classic murder mystery, with focus on who, when and how. Having read the book before, I pretty much knew how it ends; but the quality of this novel is to be found in all the intricate details of the mystery (some of which I had forgotten), and also in witty dialogue and repartee, and the growing relationship between Peter and Harriet – the knight in shining armour vs the damsel in distress. While Peter unexpectedly finds himself falling head over heels in love, Harriet feels trapped – not just physically (in custody awaiting trial, and unable to do anything about the situation herself), but also psychologically – having to depend on Peter to literally rescue her from the gallows, while all she is really longing for is to be free and independent again.

I really enjoyed rereading this one.


“Curious,” mused Wimsey , as he pattered along Bedford Row  “everybody is so remarkably helpful about this case. They cheerfully answer questions which one has no right to ask and burst into explanations in the most unnecessary manner.”

“Next to hidden treasure and mysterious documents , nothing is more full of sensational suggestion than a packet of anonymous white powder.”




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