Friday, July 7, 2017

Friday My Town - In the Café

I thought I'd show you some more photos from inside the café in the Museum Park, which I took while sitting there waiting for the rain to stop the other day. They keep an old-fashioned homelike style indoors as well as outdoors. As for the menu, they chiefly serve home-baked cakes and waffles, with coffee or tea. (But I think you might also be able to get a sandwich on demand.) The café is only open on summer afternoons and sometimes on special occasions.

 A collage to remind you what the Outdoors looks like.
 
 What the café may lack in physical sitting comfort (be prepared for straight-backed wooden chairs and benches), it makes up for in authentic old-world and hand-made atmosphere. 



I had my cup of tea (and a shortbread cookie) at this table by the window, from where I could look out over the lawn and old church - and the weather situation...



On the opposite side of the room an equally charming table and window, overlooking a small kitchen garden at the back. Pelargoniums on the window sill is still a "Swedish summer classic"... They come in a variety of colours and shades from white to red, but these tall pale pink ones would be the kind that we call Mårbacka pelargoniums, named so because it is associated with the country estate Mårbacka which was the home of the famous Swedish author Selma Lagerlöf (1858-1940, and the first female author to win the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1909).


"Home, sweet home"

Wall tapestries with various proverbs and sayings were popular back in the olden days - and often connected to home and family happiness.



"Happy is the house in which love spreads its light."
(In Swedish it rhymes!)


"In every home, even if poor,
a happy mind can bring happiness indoors." 
(Hooray - with a bit of a twist I was able to make that one almost rhyme in English, too!)
 

Friday My Town Shoot Out 

(My drink is Tea, whatever the Season!)

14 comments:

  1. The embroideries are lovely, just like my grandma used to make. I think my favorite is the woman serving pie by the rocking chair. And look, there are 'REAL" curtains! Even embroidered tablecloths! I also like the clear fridge door, so you can look at when you may want....that is a bit of modern mixed in with the traditional. Now on to outside. what is that big pole with the rings around it? And I love the green table and chairs.

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    1. Ginny, that pole with the wreaths on it is a midsummer pole or maypole. I think in other European countries like England and Germany they're commonly known as maypoles (and put up around 1st May). But in Sweden we put them up for midsummer. I've blogged about those celebrations in the past. For example in 2014

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  2. The cafe is charming and I would like to relax there and have a coffee or tea. Maybe with you :) Pretty embroideries and the outside is pretty too.

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    1. I like to visit this place at least once every summer, Terra. There are many similar open air museums all over Sweden, though, to remind us of our history. Of course each such park with a collection of old buildings is unique in its own way; but at the same time they also all remind a bit of each other. :)

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  3. I love those wall tapestries and the table you sat at and the one across from it is really pretty. I love the view and I like tht photo with the rain drops .. those table clothes are like what my mother had and she made them all. I have one of them in my living room.

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    1. My mum used to do a lot of embroidery too, table cloths and cushions and wall tapestries and whatnot, but I don't think she was too fond of this kind (with verses on them) because as far as I can recall, she never made any like that.

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  4. It's really good to see inside your café (you know how much I love my cafés) and to see the tapestries and their messages (which show that that sort of message is fairly universal).

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    1. And for me it's interesting to learn from the comments here that such tapestries were were common in other countries too, and the messages on them very much of the same kind too!

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  5. The tapestries are so pretty, lovely needlework.

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    1. It is indeed. My mum was always busy with needlework, but I never took after her in that respect!

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  6. Except for the radiator, the photo of the table across from yours looks like something Carl Larsson would have drawn - beautiful and cosy!

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    1. You're spot on about Carl Larsson, Meike. His paintings from his home (Sundborn) even also often shows those pelargoniums. I have visited that house (it is kept as a museum). Back in 1992, it must have been. Before the days of the digital camera, I'm afraid! :)

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  7. I honestly can't remember if I've ever seen embroidered and laundered tablecloths in a cafe. Certainly no embroidered wall hangings. It is delightful. I'd like to be a regular visitor there.

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    1. Not too common here either, Pauline. Except in this kind of café :) which is run by the local historical society rather than as a commercial business...

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